During the COVID-19 pandemic, our office will be open for free in-person consulations. However, if you would prefer a free virtual consultation via video conferencing, or a simple phone call, we can accommodate your needs.

Over 65 Years
Of Combined
Trial Experience

Over 65 Years Of Combined Trial Experience

Call us Today to Schedule A Free Initial Consultation

How does Louisiana law treat heroin?

On Behalf of | May 1, 2016 | Drug Charges, Firm News |

The law and society are both slowly changing opinions on certain drugs, most particularly marijuana, and those who are curious about trying many drugs are often very interested in keeping up on the laws and precedents for these various drugs. While the legalization of marijuana may be gaining popularity in some parts of the country, heroin maintains an extremely negative perception. The penalties for heroin may vary depending on the state, but the consequences of a heroin-related crime are almost always severe.

There are many different factors that may affect the sentencing of a heroin crime, including which crime is being committed, how much heroin is involved and more. In Louisiana, possessing heroin could result in four years of hard labor and thousands of dollars in fines. Selling heroin could see those same punishments extended from four years to life and from thousands of dollars to tens of thousands of dollars.

The primary reason that heroin law remains so strict in Louisiana and across the country is because the drug is considered to be very dangerous to society. In particular, individuals under the influence of heroin often commit violent crimes, which can be a public safety hazard. Additionally, a person who commits a crime under the influence of heroin could face the penalties of both the drug crime and the violent crime.

If you are facing charges related to heroin or any type of drug in Louisiana, it is in your best interests to contact an attorney as soon as possible. A defense attorney can help you better understand your rights and may be able to prepare a legal defense that will ensure you will not be convicted of a crime you did not commit. Even if the evidence is stacked against you, an attorney may be able to help you reduce your charges and walk away with a significantly lower penalty.

Archives

FindLaw Network